dd aged 15 - eating disorder?

(5 Posts)
spikeyiscool Sun 06-Oct-13 11:58:32

We have a 15 year old dd, in her GCSE year at school.

She has recently been diagnosed with glandular fever. I think she has had it for around 3 months, since the summer holidays. Part of symptoms have included a reduced appetite. I have noticed this, and also notice she has lost weight over the past few months. I think she has gone down from a size 10 to a size 8.

Yesterday she came to me in tears. Her best friend has noticed that she has really cut back on her eating and threatened to tell me. Dd has told me she rarely eats breakfast, eats a very little lunch (we make her a packed lunch, she gives most of it away apparantly) and a small dinner. She has also started a web page (which she says she has deleted) where she posts what she eats.

Dd says she will start eating properly again. She says she doesn't know why she has done this. She seems more upset that I have found out about this than the fact that she is doing it. We went out for dinner as a family yesterday (it was planned) and she ate a little. This morning she had a huge row with dp about breakfast, and ended up shovelling some cheerios down standing up and yelling at us. I know this is not the way forward. But I don't know what to do.

I think she has become used to not feeling hungry and taken it a step further. Should we be taking a step back for the next few weeks, and whilst encouraging her to eat, let her make the decision? Or should we come down hard on her, tell the school, and see a doctor?

My feeling is that she is at a crossroads and how we react will affect her. She is under a lot of pressure academically, she sets herself very high standards and is in the middle of timed assessments for GCSE.

Any ideas on how to help dd please?

YoniMatopoeia Sun 06-Oct-13 12:01:38

I would seek proper medical advice from a gp.

How would she react if you suggested that?

Dancingqueen17 Sun 06-Oct-13 22:15:15

Yes get her checked out by a doc. Early intervention with Ed's leads to much better outcomes.
The fact that she has admitted all this to you is a really good sign.
Get yourself clued up on Ed's I can't recommend FEAST and the around the dinner table forum highly enough.
www.aroundthedinnertable.org
Trust your instincts if u think something's up it probably is.

ControversialAnnie Sun 06-Oct-13 22:25:23

You need to take her to the GP. It's good that she has asked for help sooner rather than later.

Be prepared to fight for her to see a specialist, in my experience GP's can be quite dismissive of eating issues.

It might take a few weeks for an appointment to come through,in the meantime look into 'mechanical eating'. It helps to regulate hunger, so she will start to at least feel hungry at the right times.

Good luck

spikeyiscool Mon 07-Oct-13 08:55:13

Thank you for all the replies.

I know that dd has only told me because she thought her friend would if she didn't.

i am going to look up the links given here, thank you all so much.

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