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ADHD/Dyslecia/PICA

(15 Posts)
BringOnTheSunshine Tue 18-Feb-14 12:19:47

I have booked the first appointment for my son to discuss the possibility of assessment.

Briefly as possible...

I have 2 children DS7 and DD5

Our concerns are regarding DS who is struggling at home, school and socially.

DS 3 weeks early weight 5.11
developmentally reached milestones.

3-4 1/2 pre & ante-pre: mild behavioural issues- not sitting still at reading time, loud & boisterous, SALT referral

4 1/2 - 7 P1: Frequent red slips for behaviour. Started on behaviour chart at school, monthly phone calls to teacher for updates. Taking 1 hr to complete very little homework. Teachers felt he was struggling with transition to school and would settle.

P2: I posted when he stared P2 about his struggle with reading, writing, phonics (impossible), inability to concentrate on work/follow instruction/complete work. We discussed this with his teacher and head teacher. Both felt he was immature and were unconcerned. Stated no testing for dyslexia until at least 7 years old. More red slips, teachers state he is lazy as they feel he can do work but sits and stares at it. referred to educational psychologist who suggests 1 hr sessions 2 x weekly for 1-1 support with reading/writing and physical sessions to work on concentration/co-ordination. SALT stopped as they feel he has improved. Learning plan states he is disruptive in class, eats resources and lacks concentration.

P3: Less red slips (only 1 so far since Aug) Learning plan as above but sessions reduced to 1 hr each per fortnight.

Home: has very little volume control, frequently reminded to lower voice, rarely sits still- rolls around floor, jumps on the spot, fidgets while sitting eating or watching TV. overly excitable and angry outbursts - easily frustrated, low self esteem (will say I am stupid, I can't do this, everyone hates me) he is not violent in general but has ... very rarely... hit me in anger. requires frequent reminders/prompting to complete simple tasks (getting washed and dressed) or he becomes distracted. He has awareness of consequences & what is appropriate behaviour but very little to no impulse control. His homework has improved slightly
but that is mainly due to DH working daily getting him to remember words/spellings. He eats paper, pens/pencils, rubber, wood, toys. He has a nervous cough which occurs when he is asked to read/write. He picks at his skin on his face/hands until they bleed and scar.

Socially: clingy, jumping, running can't stand still when we are shopping/talking to other people. Interrupts, growls/shouts etc.
Struggles to make friends and play with groups, hides from other children. He enjoys chase games (superheroes/police) struggles with sports. Can't grasp simple rules for team play.

We were initially concerned that our son may be dyslexic but are also wondering about ADHD and PICA.

DD is having no issues at present she appears to be coping in all areas. She has been copying Ds behaviour at times....interrupting/clinging but those are abnormal behaviour for her.

BringOnTheSunshine Tue 18-Feb-14 12:37:02

Just realised I made a spelling mistake in the title
Dyslexia
blush

osospecial Tue 18-Feb-14 16:16:06

Have you ever seen an occupational therapist about sensory issues? It sounds like it would be worth you asking for a referral. Some things sound quite similar to my dd4. I found the book 'the out of sync child' very good at explaining why my dd did a lot of things (fidgets, jumps around, crashes into things, and putting inedibles in her mouth).
I'm sure somebody else will be along soon as I've learned a lot about my dds behaviour and the reasons for it through this board.
Also I find omega 3 chewable tablets help with the concentration issue.

PolterGoose Tue 18-Feb-14 21:19:08

I too think an OT assessment would be a good start. I think I'd want him seen by a developmental paed. It might be a good idea to do some reading around the various neuro/developmental conditions eg ADHD, ASDs, Sensory processing, dyspraxia and dyslexia, make notes of anything relevant as you go, you're not trying to diagnose, the reading just broadens your scope and might help you identify stuff you hadn't noticed too! You will also come across things to try to help as you go. Keep a detailed diary to help you remember stuff and to spot patterns and triggers, you can video him too, it's all evidence that helps you get those important referrals.

Good luck flowers

BringOnTheSunshine Tue 18-Feb-14 21:35:40

Thanks, I haven't even thought about OT. Would the GP refer for service or can I do it?

I could tick the majority of boxes for ADHD, we still feel there is a possibility of dyslexia...unable to remember order days, months, seasons etc mixes numbers and letters forgets words like "and" when reading. Memorises spelling but can forget 24 hours later.

PICA is new to me, just read about it today when I realised all the strange things he eats.

I feel like I have been attached to this computer all day :-)

PolterGoose Tue 18-Feb-14 22:06:42

GP or school nurse should be able to refer.

osospecial Tue 18-Feb-14 22:15:20

I had to get a referral from the health visitor or GP to see OT but it may be different in your area. I'm sure they would advise you if you rang your local hv/GP.
My dd is hyposensitive so she's under sensitive to movement and always needs to be jumping, spinning, crashing into things, hanging upside down etc i know it can look quite similar to ADHD sometimes to way she struggles to concentrate or sit still for any length of time so it may be worth investigating alongside ADHD. The OT can also help with advising on things like a wobble cushion to sit on in school and different things to try.
I know what you mean about 'eating the resources'! Dd has to be watched with any crayons/play dough etc in school as she will try and eat them! I find chewy tubes (t-shaped red tube) /chewy Stixx, chewellery, things like that quite good to give that they are allowed to put in their mouth but can swallow and helps concentration. I usually buy them from amazon.

osospecial Tue 18-Feb-14 22:18:36
BringOnTheSunshine Wed 19-Feb-14 11:36:36

That's a great idea. I was wondering about something like a stress ball so he hand fidget with it while working...but was worried he would start eating it. I take it they are solid rather than soft rubber?

BringOnTheSunshine Wed 19-Feb-14 11:37:29

so he can fidget with it.

my fingers are typing faster than my brain is working

osospecial Wed 19-Feb-14 13:41:33

Yes they are solid smile

Jacksterbear Thu 20-Feb-14 17:00:10

Hi OP, yet another vote for getting an OT assessment! Obviously not offering a dx for you, but sensory issues could potentially explain pretty much all the difficulties you describe.

As examples, my 7yo ds who has SPD:
- is constantly crawling, climbing, jumping, rocking, fidgeting, hanging upside down, headbutting, chewing, clinging, grabbing, pulling, pushing, hugging, squawking, screeching etc, due to hypofunctioning vestibular and proprioceptive systems and poor tactile & auditory discrimination;
- has poor impulse control, working memory and planning and organisational skills;
- is clumsy and awkward due to sensory-based motor problems and hypermobility;
- has problems with reading and writing (eg left-right reversals) due to poor spacial awareness and directionality - again a result of the vestibular issues;
- has high anxiety, low self-esteem, and poor emotional recognition and regulation, at least in part due directly to his sensory issues (although we more recently have received an ASD dx for him which also explains these aspects).

Lots of neurological / developmental / psychological conditions can present very similarly, and lots of them are also commonly co-morbid with each other, so it's definitely worth getting full professional assessment so you can get to the bottom of the issues and what's causing them, and get appropriate management strategies in place.

BringOnTheSunshine Thu 20-Feb-14 21:26:18

Thanks, I am going to ask the GP for OT referral and medical exam...rule out physical reasons for odd eating habits etc. I have booked an optician appointment for next week. He does a normal eye test and visual perception assessment.

MadameSin Fri 21-Feb-14 19:03:52

What is PICA??

PolterGoose Fri 21-Feb-14 19:07:18

Pica is eating things that aren't foodstuffs

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