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Could you give me some advice about IEP please?

(61 Posts)
inthesark Mon 22-Apr-13 18:49:16

The conversation with school went something like this:

Me: You know you said you were looking at giving DD an IEP?

School: Oh, yes, she's got one.

Me: Ummmm, somewhat dumbstruck because I thought that parents were meant to be at least informed when their child got an IEP, if not actually involved in the process. Or have I got that completely wrong?

This is all in the context of a bit of a barney with school, who have a habit of agreeing to do something and then not doing it, so I think they may just have knocked up the IEP in a hurry when they realised it had been forgotten, so I'd quite like to have my facts right before I get back to them...

supermum98 Tue 30-Apr-13 22:02:25

I've even invented my own model 'the 5 D model' try it and see if the defensiveness falls into one of these categories. deny/diminish/dismiss/deflect/disinterest. That is usually what I get, not hey welcome as a resource and one of the team around the child etc. As for IEP's my ds hasn't got one and told all schools do provision mapping now. I have not been involved with any target setting. IEP's seem to be a big white elephant that most schools either don't do or do badly.

supermum98 Tue 30-Apr-13 22:02:54

I've even invented my own model 'the 5 D model' try it and see if the defensiveness falls into one of these categories. deny/diminish/dismiss/deflect/disinterest. That is usually what I get, not hey welcome as a resource and one of the team around the child etc. As for IEP's my ds hasn't got one and told all schools do provision mapping now. I have not been involved with any target setting. IEP's seem to be a big white elephant that most schools either don't do or do badly.

Handywoman Tue 30-Apr-13 22:05:32

Ooh supermum98 I LOVE your 5d model!

inthesark Wed 01-May-13 13:12:25

That's genius. I think you should get funding to study it properly.

Our lot seem to specialise in deflect, when you do get a meeting out of them. Although they mostly seem to specialise in a 6th, dithering, where they talk a lot about something but don't actually make anything happen. grin

LightAFire Wed 01-May-13 14:54:41

deny/diminish/dismiss/deflect/disinterest. That is usually what I get, not hey welcome as a resource and one of the team around the child etc.

I just don't understand why that happens. (I'm hearing it over and over though so I do believe it!) Someone else mentioned that teachers are maybe feeling busy - but for me parents can be a HELP! I had one girl who suffered possible epilepsy and I was quite concerned - when her mum came in to explain her symptoms me I said "Great, I'll get a pen and write this down, thanks". I then typed it up and gave it to the staff so we all knew what to do.

As for IEP's my ds hasn't got one and told all schools do provision mapping now.

My SENCO friend says that Oftsed are going off IEPs, so I guess this is the "new thing".

I have not been involved with any target setting. IEP's seem to be a big white elephant that most schools either don't do or do badly.

Sadly, yes I agree. My best mate is having massive wrangles with her school over her visually impaired child and the lack of support there too - his lack of concentration has been put down to "immaturity" rather than eye strain... hmm

inthesark also sadly familiar. Things seem to be written down and then ignored... Do you have any diagnosis or anything which can back up your DD's need for support? What do the school feel she needs and do you agree? (Even if they are failing to do it!)

And digress.

Our meetings were all about how to not actually talk about ds, but other random things to use up the time epecialy what the parents might 'need' that was not in their budget nor remit to deliver.

I always thought team AROUND the child meant exactly that. How to get AROUND them instead of actually facing them directly and doing something.

moondog Wed 01-May-13 19:07:39

Public sector special needs industry drones have perfected the art of report writing. Vague recommendations are made to other vaguely defined drones.

The problem is the recommendations are too vague to be carried out and the drones responsible for carrying out the vague recommendations are never specified either.

One of the (many) marvellous teachers of my acquaintance has highly detailed checklist in her class. not only are each of the individual children's specified tasks to be ticked off daily, the staff member who carried it out is expected to initial it as well.

There is no issue with this whatsoever.
Everyone knows exactly what to do and is happy to sign it off as one of their completed tasks.

And I bet the initialler does it with pride that his/her work is demonstrated!?

moondog Wed 01-May-13 19:22:52

Yes! Nothing better than having your hard work captured and acknowledged.

MareeyaDolores Wed 01-May-13 21:41:00

really love the 5 D model. Am going to memorise it!

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