GCSE/A level jump

(12 Posts)
Scrazy Wed 30-Jan-13 22:52:25

What do you want to study? IME this year, and the next few years you will be fine dropping even a couple of grades. Thanks to the fee increases (said in irony), the competitions is reduced and everyone one was allowed room. AAA offers were lowered to ABC etc and this will happen in the future. Students are consumers nowadays.

Even Oxford were letting people in who missed their grades.

Biscuitsneeded Wed 30-Jan-13 19:17:29

The thing is it's possible to get a full house of A and A* at GCSE by being quite bright, being well taught, and working hard. Being quite bright and working hard will not necessarily get you As at A-level in academic subjects like science, maths, or MFL. So you need to be very honest with yourself and work out whether you are genuinely pretty able or just a good all-rounder who works hard. And unless you have dreams of medical school, I would still think a B or C in chemistry would be preferable to an A in some other subjects, so don't discount it if you really enjoy it, but bear in mind it is a big step up and you will have to work very hard!

BackforGood Wed 30-Jan-13 19:11:17

There's no way we can predict. My niece was an A and A* pupil at GCSE, but then really struggled with the jump and was relieved to end up with all Cs at A-Level. OTOH, there are plenty of students who do achieve As and A*s at A-level, so clearly lots and lots will - you just need to know it's not automatic.
My ds is in L6th, and has found the workload a real culture shock. It's how you cope with that, along with how good the teaching is, that will determine how you get on, not your GCSE grades automatically.

Gcsekid Wed 30-Jan-13 18:57:10

I feel like chemistry will be the hardest and that's what I'm most worried about, but I feel 3 A's at alevel will really secure me a place at a decent h university in a science course, would AAB be sufficient?

tiggytape Wed 30-Jan-13 18:23:41

A lot will depend on the teaching you've had so far, the A Level teachers you get and also the subjects you choose. Sciences can be a much bigger jump for people who have followed combined rather than triple sciences for example. Some subjects seem better organised than others and some pupils make the transition to more independent learning better than others.

There is no reason to think you cannot do it but straight A's at A Level aren't guaranteed just by getting straight A's at GCSE. Is there a reason you need 3 A grade A levels? If it is for a particular course or career path there are also other things you can do to boost your chances eg relevant work experience over the next couple of years.

Milliways Wed 30-Jan-13 18:21:03

DS got almost 100% UMS at Chemistry GSCE but dropped Chemistry after AS as was finding it SO hard (got a C with LOADS of extra work). Maths and the Sciences are all a huge jump. He is predicted A*/A at his other 3 subjects though.

If you are only taking 3 at AS level though you will have more time to do the extra work. The grades are achievable if you are prepared to put in the effort from the start.

Best of luck!

Scrazy Wed 30-Jan-13 18:09:04

Sorry, should have added, that you have a better chance than most people. You can do it with hard work.

Scrazy Wed 30-Jan-13 17:59:00

It's not always the case. The jump between the two is huge and it greatly depends on the level of teaching in the sixth form or college.

IME a straight A* A grade at GCSE ended up without 1 A at A level, predicted 3 A's. The teaching was lacking and the subjects were hard. It all worked out well in the end though but it was a shock.

solidfoundation Wed 30-Jan-13 17:53:28

If you can't do it with your GCSE grades, what hope is there for people with poorer GCSE grades? If you feel confident about being able to keep up with the work load, go for it. Good luck.

NatashaBee Wed 30-Jan-13 17:51:31

I wouldn't assume you'll obtain straight As at A level, just because you got them for GCSE. I really struggled with A Levels despite being a straight A GCSE student - a lot more of your own research and critical thinking is required, and some people who'd been 'middle of the class' really came into their own with that.

GinandJag Wed 30-Jan-13 17:45:49

I don't think you can predict your grades until you actually start the A-level courses.

Gcsekid Wed 30-Jan-13 17:19:21

I'm a straight A student at Gcse, with one B, but how difficult will it be to achieve AAA at alevel - the courses being biology, chemistry, and psychology

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