Am I the only person who doesn't buy teacher a present??

(78 Posts)
nurseneedshelp Sun 14-Jul-13 20:53:57

I'm shocked by all the threads about buying the teachers a present, I'm very grateful for their input but its their job and they get paid!

BackforGood Sun 14-Jul-13 23:44:56

I've generally put a tin of chocs or biscuits or something in the staffroom with a nice homemade (by dc) card. There are just too many staff who go the extra mile to make it such a fab school - my dd has a class teacher, and they set for maths and English so that's two more, then there's the people who go above and beyond what they need to do, in that they give a lot of time to running the sports teams she plays in, then there's the lovely Receptionist, and of course the PPA teacher. Then there's the teacher that runs the choir and the one that runs the chess club. that's before you get on to the 5 lovely ladies that run the excellent breakfast club.

Then there are people like her Scout Leaders - all volunteers and all wonderful people, and the chap that runs the football team she plays with on a Saturday, oh, and her piano teacher, and what about her Sunday school teachers....... you could just go on and on if you felt compelled to give to all staff who 'go the extra mile' just for that one dd alone...... and I've got 3 dc!

NoComet Sun 14-Jul-13 23:56:45

No, I'm a sporadic forgetful, disorganised teacher present buyer. Sometimes I do, often I don't.

Only once was I very organised order a special, slightly pricy present, but that was for the teacher who had taught both the DDs for five years (combined classes) and been endlessly patient stopping DCs picking on DD1 and generally making life at school tolerable for her.

louisianablue2000 Mon 15-Jul-13 00:03:02

Nope, not buying anyone anything. Never gave presents when I was a child, not going to now.

Shesparkles Mon 15-Jul-13 00:09:24

I only give a gift when the teacher has been particularly good with ds, his teacher this year has been brilliant, has totally "got" ds and how he works, and has made his, and in turn, the whole family's school year very positive. I'm delighted that she's going to have his class again next year.

Last year's teacher, on the other hand, the less said the better!

nurseneedshelp Mon 15-Jul-13 00:29:08

My children's teachers are all fantastic and I always make a point of thanking them at parents evening etc.

I just think how daunting it must be to receive all those gifts and its where to draw the line, even the lolly pop person has dozens of flowers and chocolates!

I've never heard of a class collection either?
Not sure how I feel about that.

Periwinkle007 Mon 15-Jul-13 03:37:10

i hadnt come across class collections either. mind my first yr this yr but we always just did individual presents when i was at school.

trinity0097 Mon 15-Jul-13 06:56:47

I would say that about half my form didn't get me a present, and a few of the children who I teach who are leaving got me a present, probably about 15-20 presents from a total of 14 in my form and about 55 children that I teach. I don't mind either way, it's nice to be appreciated, but I don't expect it. I buy gifts for all my form and tutees at the end of every term.

mrz Mon 15-Jul-13 06:57:26

A simple thank you or a handmade card from the child is more than enough gifts aren't necessary

Maybe I'm weird but I give all sorts of presents to people who get paid - binmen for example. Because recognising their extra effort is, erm, good manners.

Anyway I'm not buying a present but making/writing one.

FadedSapphire Mon 15-Jul-13 09:51:40

Cards here. Maybe handmade if ds makes the effort [few to do] but probably not. Will have personalised message [however odd] from him in each one. He is a reluctant writer so this will be huge effort.

Pyrrah Mon 15-Jul-13 10:03:44

I think it's a nice thing to do if you want to.

DD's teacher and TAs have been so lovely to her this year, she's also leaving and so we want to give them something as a thank you.

I think in the younger classes, the staff are almost substitute mummy much of the day. Lots of hugs and cuddles and making sure she's happy and wiping away tears when I leave or she gets hurt. To say nothing of the fortune in stickers that the teacher must have handed out this year!

Was actually wondering if a large box of stickers would be a good gift?

CircassianLeyla Mon 15-Jul-13 11:16:12

DS2 has planned what he is going to write. In his class there is another TA who works with an autistic child and he had decided he is going to write "thank you for looking after X" which I thought was nice.

(little sob at "thank you for looking after x" - that's beautiful)

Pyrrah as suggested on another thread I've just ordered some stickers from ebay. "Miss Lacey says I'm a star" type things. DD1's teacher (not Miss Lacey!) loves a sticker smile

Fuzzymum1 Mon 15-Jul-13 12:03:25

I do if I think the teacher has gone above and beyond. This year my DS3 has an amazing teacher who really 'got' him and he has made amazing progress. I am doing a small (partially hand made by him) gift from DS and will write her a heartfelt thank you card - I really really do appreciate her and although it's not necessary I know she will appreciate it and I want her to know how much we really do appreciate how much she's done for him.

nothingnew Mon 15-Jul-13 12:31:04

I didn't buy presents for teachers before until I realised almost every is doing it and I don't want my dcs feeling left out so I start doing it. But I only buy something like chocolates or biscuits something cheap and cheerful. However I ve seem some parents even bought flowers and things for teachers birthdays...... a bit ott imo and it made me feel quite humble at the same time. Although I believe majority of teachers are fair minded I do feel that in some cases this can create favouritism. It was the culture in my own school days.

nothingnew Mon 15-Jul-13 12:33:04

Sorry I mean it WASN'T the culture in my own school days.

Floggingmolly Mon 15-Jul-13 12:48:47

Flowers for the teacher's birthday is arse licking gone wild, nothingnew.
I've never even heard of this shock

nothingnew Mon 15-Jul-13 13:44:06

Yes.............. Flogg.......... especially being a state school. The teachers are public employees. But perhaps I read into it too much!

CircassianLeyla Mon 15-Jul-13 13:46:03

HorryIsUpduffed - it was my proud mummy moment.

GW297 Mon 15-Jul-13 13:55:26

Card with a nice message in it is fine, plus taking the time to say thank you and goodbye at the end of the last day.

GreenSkittles Mon 15-Jul-13 15:13:26

Can anyone recommend a decent but cheap bottle of wine to give? I don't drink it, and I don't want to gif something undrinkable, but my ds wants to buy gifts for four teachers, plus another gift and card for his autism mentor.

We have a Sainsbury's , M&S and Teso Metro locally. Is it possible to get a nice bottle of wine around £5?

FishCalledWonder Mon 15-Jul-13 15:24:58

All the teachers i have ever worked with, (and i realise that i may just have been lucky) go above and beyond what is expected of them. They work evenings and weekends and look after the well-being of the children in their class, as well as educating them.

When DD is old enough to go to school, i will definitely want to acknowledge this hard work and commitment, even if it's just with a card.

sittinginthesun Mon 15-Jul-13 16:50:44

I am the daughter of a primary school teacher, and I loved the last day of term. Endless boxes of Matchmakers and chocolate oranges!

I always add a bar of chocolate so they can share with their own children. wink

Oh, and to those saying that its their job etc etc, I work in private practise but the odd bottle of wine, bunch of flowers or thank you card is so wonderful. It's the feeling that you are actually appreciated.

sittinginthesun Mon 15-Jul-13 16:51:08

Or were they matchsticks???...

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