Montessori for DS??

(11 Posts)
SunnyIntervals Thu 08-Aug-13 22:00:51

We have a few months to decide whether to register DS for the local state preschool at 3. He has been dx with hearing problems (significant hearing loss now treated with grommets) and is young for his age with speech and language delay.

One option is a private Montessori preschool.

Has anyone got children at somewhere like this? Would it suit a child like DS? What difference does the Montessori element make?

imip Thu 08-Aug-13 22:11:41

I've sent my two oldest dds to a Montessori preschool and dd3 goes currently goes to a Montessori nursery. I have nothing but good things to say about it! I guess to some extent you need to go to a 'good' Montessori, but if you visit it and get a good feel for it, that should be a good indication.

What difference does the Montessori element make? Well, when my oldest dds started school, the reception teacher noted both times that dd picked up a peice of work, completed the work and put it away without any prompting. That is what they do at Montessori. I like the fact that most things at Montessori are purposeful. I think it has had a positive influence on their primary school education.

For your son in particular, I think Montessori would be very helpful. It does, of course, depend on the Montessori. Like any other nursery, some would be better than others.

Perhaps you should ask to observe a class for a short while to see what you think? Or have a look on youtube at some of the 'work' they do to give you a better insight.

SunnyIntervals Fri 09-Aug-13 07:44:18

Imip that is really interesting, thank you!!

I guess one thing that worries me is whether the very structured approach would suit DS as i think others would say he is a very stereotypical boy in his play (not that we buy in to gender stereotyping) and loves to experiment eg worked out that his drum stick would make a great play DoH tool so went and tried it out and likes to make up novel games.

SunnyIntervals Fri 09-Aug-13 13:53:22

Anyone else have any advice?

SunnyIntervals Fri 09-Aug-13 18:35:12

Bump! smile

imip Fri 09-Aug-13 21:11:17

I think 'structured' can be open to interpretation. In the morning, you may have a choice of 'work' to do (washing hands, painting, washing windows, mathematical aids, puzzle etc). You may then join a group for a story, your choice, you can sit and observe others. You wouldn't just play in an unstructured fashion for a full three hours. I have 4dds, and I feel that the structured nature of it gives my kids some balance from e crazy chaos of home. What's more, I think it gives them a great grounding for school, in a way that I feel convention nursery may not. In my hometown of melbourne, primary schools use a number of Montessori concepts in mainstream education. Hth.

SunnyIntervals Fri 09-Aug-13 21:25:43

Interesting, thank you!

NigellasGuest Fri 09-Aug-13 21:27:59

I would advise finding a Montessori that is accredited, or at least working towards accreditation - link:

www.montessori.org.uk/msa__and__schools/find_a_school

Also any Montessori school that is "very structured" is not a proper Montessori. Self discipline and independence are promoted and the child's natural interests promoted. It will not be a case of "Everyone stop what you're doing NOW - we are all going to do playdoh/paint/have a story/play outside/have snack etc etc etc. There will be group activities but the main focus should be the child interacting with the prepared environment and being planned for accordingly. Mainstream pre-schools should also be taking this approach more and more because it is also what the EYFS advocates.

SunnyIntervals Fri 09-Aug-13 22:17:11

Thank you Nigella - it is accredited the one we are considering - just checked!

SunnyIntervals Mon 12-Aug-13 18:55:02

One last bump for any more advice

NigellasGuest Tue 13-Aug-13 09:46:53

I can't really offer any more advice than I've given above, but thought I would point out that there are a LOT of myths out there about Montessori so don't necessarily go by what you hear - just go to the Montessori school itself and ask, ask, ask all the questions you need to and go by gut instinct too. Do the children look independently motivated and engaged?

You will probably find that the Montessori is much calmer than the other nurseries you visit (and YES visit the other ones as well, state and private non-Montessori) .... and that calmness in itself will help any child with hearing loss, Montessori or not! Check for evidence of inclusive practice, e.g., visual cues on the walls such as a picture or photo by the sink of a child washing their hands, that kind of thing.....

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