This problem needs addressed urgently...

(13 Posts)
camtt Sat 23-Mar-13 18:38:16

this would also be a common way to express yourself in Northern Ireland

Euphemia Sat 23-Mar-13 18:36:58

Mmm custard rolls ...

grin

Moominsarehippos Thu 21-Mar-13 15:03:27

Not get yer baps out?

CatWithKittens Thu 21-Mar-13 10:12:53

Moominsarehippos, I think it is so that, in households where it applies, when a servant is asked to get the rolls out, he or she goes to the breadbin and not to the garage.

notimefors Wed 20-Mar-13 23:39:33

I'm from Yorkshire and I only started to hear this - from locals - when I lived in Kent & Herts!

Moominsarehippos Wed 20-Mar-13 23:32:16

Don't start me on 'bread' rolls. Why need the 'bread'? They're not made out of brick or custard are they?

trixymalixy Wed 20-Mar-13 23:26:21

Agree with Sweetestthing. I'm Scottish and my DH is English. He would say"needs ironing" which sounded totally wrong to me as in Scotland we would say "needs ironed".

openerofjars Wed 20-Mar-13 23:24:54

Interesting, thank you!

Yes, it's a Scottish/Northern thing. My dh (Scottish) would say "It needs cleaned". I (Southern England) would say either "It needs cleaning" or "It needs to be cleaned".

I was brought up in Scotland and this is how we would say it. I found it very odd when I moved to England and heard people say 'It needs mending/doing/cleaning'

GranToAirMissiles Wed 20-Mar-13 22:24:33

I think there is a general trend to shorten everything, especially in the media where space and time are limited. At the same time, I think usages like 'needs addressed' are more frequent in the north.

FloatyBeatie Wed 20-Mar-13 22:18:49

I think it's quite common in North Eastern language. I've certainly noticed it a lot as a southerner living in the NE. I wouldn,'t have said it was a new trend, round here at least.

openerofjars Wed 20-Mar-13 22:15:26

Where is "to be"? What happened to the infinitive there?

Is it common in some varieties of English or is it a new thing? I hear it a lot in radio interviews, for some reason.

I'm trying to think of other examples, but can only come up with v similar ones and I'm poorly and it's late.

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