duvet washing

(24 Posts)
MrsBucketxx Fri 23-Aug-13 16:23:30

I have never washed a duvet before just bought new ones and as I have been told this is bad for our wallets environment etc.

I cant get this washed at home my washer isn't big enough, I have been quoted between £15 and £27 for a service wash.

How often do you clean yours? and how much do you pay for a service wash?

MrsBucketxx Fri 23-Aug-13 16:24:15

Btw the service wash amount seems like loads to me.

PoppyWearer Fri 23-Aug-13 16:29:02

I'm sure I spent less than that to get ours dry cleaned last time.

olivo Fri 23-Aug-13 16:30:48

I wash them all in our home washing machine. It isn't a big one but I just stuff them in and shake them out before they dry on the washing line.

olivo Fri 23-Aug-13 16:31:25

Oh, and I do them about twice a year, unless someone is ill ,then I usually so them after that.

happydutchmummy Fri 23-Aug-13 18:34:30

I do mine (feather ones) in the washing machine at home, and then tumble dry it for hours. The label says this is ok to do. And I do it whenever dd has an 'accident' in the bed and its soaked trough the duvet cover. I do have to cram it in the washing machine, but it does fit!

Do you have a lovely family member/friend nearby whose washer/dryer you can use for a few hours. If not, then I'm sure local supermarkets/laundrettes often have special offers on throughout the year so if its not urgent then just wait till you see one.

Jan49 Fri 23-Aug-13 20:00:33

A much cheaper way would be to take them to a launderette and do them yourself in their large machines. In my town the big machine would fit a double duvet and costs £6. The dryer might cost another few £££. I think the price you've been quoted is a rip-off.

I'm the only duvet-user in my household and wash them at the launderette. I have a single winter one and a single summer one and each one gets washed when it's out of use, so the summer one might be used for April-Sept then washed and the winter one would be used approximately Oct-March and then washed. I know I could probably buy a new one for the price I pay to wash one, but as you say, that's not the environmentally correct thing to do and I think if I had to I'd just carry on using the same one and not bother to wash it, rather than replace it regularly.

Leviticus Sat 24-Aug-13 00:19:41

YY local launderette. £4 for big machine wash then sling over the rotary washing line at home to dry.

PeriodMath Sat 24-Aug-13 00:26:39

Oh my god, I have NEVER washed a duvet!

ChubbyKitty Sat 24-Aug-13 01:05:11

I've never done it before blush

Me and DP have lived together for 11 months and had the same duvet so..yeah..that's probably pretty skanky.

Just out of interest would it be like doing normal laundry, 2 shot glass of powder and 2 capfuls of fabric conditioner? Or would one need something fancier?

Hypothetically speaking, of coursewink

Sleepathon Sat 24-Aug-13 06:44:35

Snap Jan.

Manage to wash the summer king duvet at home as its quite thin but always take the winter one to the self service launderette

MrsBucketxx Sat 24-Aug-13 08:20:05

Mines a winter king one, im pretty nesh is the same all year round, so its not going to go in the washer at home,

olivo Sat 24-Aug-13 08:41:07

I just use a normal measure of washing liquid,no fabric conditioner.

Leviticus Sat 24-Aug-13 08:42:13

Kitty I wouldn't use conditioner on a duvet, it could make it less puffy.

I can fit a winter king (feather) or all-season superking (man-made) in our 7kg. You'd be surprised.

Our dry cleaner charges £15 for a king. That's why I've learned to do it myself. Once a year is easy; once a season would be better.

And don't use bio on feathers - it eats them.

ChubbyKitty Sat 24-Aug-13 13:13:42

Suppose someone was to do this, what temperature or program would be best?

I checked the label - it said 40 degrees, not too fast spin.

ChubbyKitty Sat 24-Aug-13 13:25:25

Ah right cool.

I had a look at my label and it had no temperature.

Also told me it was dangerous to dry clean it! What??

I imagine the chemicals would eat the feathers - is it feather? If so, don't use biological washing detergent. Must be non-bio. Doesn't matter if the duvet is synthetic.

Cloudkitten Sat 24-Aug-13 14:11:29

Our local launderette charges £15 for a service wash and dry of a duvet.

I think it would be £6 to just have it washed and then take it home to dry.

I don't wash it all the time so I'm ok with £15 or £6 for wash only.

If it's a really big duvet I wouldn't risk busting your own washing machine if you don't think it will take it. If it breaks the drum (or whatever) then it will cost a lot more than £15/£6 to get it fixed.

I do wash the pillows frequently in our washing machine though - these are often overlooked - urgh the sweaty hair smell on pillows that are never washed!

ChubbyKitty Sat 24-Aug-13 14:22:15

Not feather no, although I do have non-bio anyway so it's all good.

Never even thought about pillows. Makes sense now you mention it. Plus I'm a dribbler, and it's no doubt soaked through the pillow case on occasion...shock

alemci Sat 24-Aug-13 14:32:30

i was told when i bought my new feather duvet that it should just be hung out on a sunny day (not today) and sponged with water and not washed in a machine as detergent would ruin it.?

i used to wash the other feather one and my feather pillows have been washed

QuiteOldGal Sat 24-Aug-13 17:09:35

I just cram mine in the washing machine with some liquid and wash at 60 always once a year on a hot sunny day so I can hang it out. Its a 9 tog and a 4.5 tog one which can clip together so probably not as big as some and handy for washing as 2 separate ones.

It was about £50 for both together but has been much better value than replacing a cheap one each year and means we have a winter and summer duvet

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