The actual mechanics of secondary school admissions...

(6 Posts)
springlamb Tue 20-Nov-12 09:10:27

Can anyone help, I just can't get my head around it, it's in the back of my mind constantly and I need to put it to bed until about mid-February.
Although DD is not my eldest, this is the first time I've been through the Yr7 admission process. To complicate matters we are applying in a different county, which has the grammar school system. DD did not sit the 11+ but is achieving very well and would certainly have been considered 11+ material. Her first choice school has an assessment day on Saturday. The top 20% are guaranteed intake (although I have not told DD this as she's an anxious sort). Presumably, many of the 11+ students will also be sitting this exam but will go on to be offered places at grammars, thus freeing up more of the 20% at our preferred school.
But on offer day, will they be offered a place at our preferred school anyway, meaning that DD is likely not to be offered a place.
How the heck does this work? Do the grammars write out early to those with a place so that they get taken out of the equation or what?
I know this is long and more than a tad neurotic. I know I need to just sit back and let the process run through. I accept I am a control freak who has come up against something I just cannot control. But any insights gratefully received.

tiggytape Tue 20-Nov-12 09:33:04

springlamb - in simple terms, everybody gets just one offer each and that is the highest ranked school that they qualify for.

So all those people who have passed the 11+ in the other town and who also pass the test on Saturday will get just one offer and that depends on which school they said they liked best on their form.

If they pass every test with a high enough score to qualify in theory for a place at every school, they still only get one offer: the one that they put highest up on their form. If they put the grammar school above the 20% test school then their single offer will come from the grammar school and that frees up a place at the 20% test school for someone else to get an offer.

This is all done by the council and is why you have to fill in your 3 or 6 choices in advance. It is to tell the council that, in the event of your child qualifying for more than one school, which school the council should reject on your behalf.

Blu Tue 20-Nov-12 09:34:38

Everyone gets one offer - the school highest on their list that can offer them a place. So if people have applied to grammars and have put them higher on their list than the school you are applying for they will get offered that place (if they pass) and will not be offereed the place at 'you' school, leaving more availability for 'you' school.

Likewise if a school lower down your list can offer you a place, it will automatically be declined and freed up for others if you have been accepted by a school higher on your list.

springlamb Tue 20-Nov-12 11:09:54

Thank you. Thank you. If you knew me in RL you would pee laughing that this should be causing me so much stress. I am known at work for my cool demeanour and calm exterior. So laid back with DD over all this...'it's not the end of the world sweetie, you'll do well wherever you go...'
I think I just want everyone who's applied for grammar to get a place at grammar and get off my radar, so good luck to you all.
I am to drop her in the 20% school's coach park on Saturday morning where she will be met by staff. I think I should wear my good knickers, just in case! (And have a loan of a half decent car for the day!)

springlamb Tue 20-Nov-12 11:11:16

It's a good job we don't have to queue for school places, I'd be batting people out of the way and end up arrested.

tiggytape Tue 20-Nov-12 12:02:50

springlamb - I think school admissions is one area that can drive the most relaxed parent a little bit doo-lally!
It is all so totally out of your control and, no mattter what you tell yourself when they are younger, by the start of Year 6 you get caught up in the mania that it really does matter very much afterall. It is an old cliche but, despite many stresses and some nasty surprises on allocations day, I have yet to meet a Year 7 parent who doesn't think things turned out for the best in the end.

Good luck for Saturday

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