giving up breastfeeding after 13 years

(80 Posts)
JanH Wed 20-Apr-05 09:33:15

yes, 13 years, not 13 months (more than one child though ): Guardian article.

emkana Wed 20-Apr-05 23:13:58

Sorry, passion, but comments like yours really really p**ss me off.
If I came on here and said anything like that about a bottlefed child, or about a child who has been through controlled crying, I would get shot down in flames one thousand times over. Where on earth do you take the belief from that a child who has been breastfed long term will end up a problem boyfriend with a mother fixation? Do you know any adults whatsoever who have been b/fed for over a year? Or even for over six months?
I do actually know a man who was b/fed for four years. He is a lovely, considerate, kind husband and father, an absolute pleasure. Don't know if it's anything to do with b/feeding though!
But for "theories" like yours there is absolutely no proof or evidence whatsoever.

emkana Wed 20-Apr-05 23:19:08

Michael Jordan (basketball star) was breastfed for 3 years.
Pele (Brazilian football star) was breastfed for five years.

And what disgusting pervs they are...

bobbybob Thu 21-Apr-05 00:28:19

Oh and Michael Jackson wasn't...

bobbybob Thu 21-Apr-05 00:28:49

State your source Passion...

suzywong Thu 21-Apr-05 00:32:51

has this thng kicked off yet?

bobbybob Thu 21-Apr-05 02:11:00

Nah, mostly because Passion hasn't come back and I can't be bothered.

suzywong Thu 21-Apr-05 07:48:39

Tut

cellogirl Thu 21-Apr-05 08:39:11

I was bf for 18 months, and I am not a perv, thank you very much.

I don't have the sporting prowess, or money, of Pele sadly .......

Ameriscot2005 Thu 21-Apr-05 08:54:49

I've been breastfeeding continuously, except for periods of 5 months during 3 of my pregnancies, for 13.5 years and expect to continue another year. That will take my continuous PG/BF to 15 years - not particularly amazing historically.

bobbybob Thu 21-Apr-05 08:56:59

A genuine question for the "it makes me feel sick" people.

Is it less nausea inducing if we talk about girls being fed past talking/walking age?

tex111 Thu 21-Apr-05 09:13:20

I do have a genuine question and I'm not trying to stir things up. Honestly! I was wondering what are the benefits to the child with long-term breastfeeding. Once they're eating solids and have a varied diet are there any nutritional benefits to breast milk? I understand closeness to mother is always a benefit but they don't necessarily need to be breastfeeding in order to be have physical contact.

I'm pregnant with my second and last baby and am very curious to know more about this. Books generally don't go past the point of about age one or two so I would be grateful for any info you ladies can pass on.

SkiBunnyFlummy Thu 21-Apr-05 09:27:48

If I was her I'd be treating myself and my husband to a well deserved spa weekend (praps with a cheeky little breast augmentation thrown in for good luck)

ggglimpopo Thu 21-Apr-05 09:30:17

Message withdrawn

Tessiebear Thu 21-Apr-05 09:32:58

That is a very good question Tex (Congrats on your pregnancy btw). I B/F DS2 for 2 years and towards the end i did it for HIS comfort reasons and getting him to sleep etc - i would assume that past about a year there wasnt that mant additional health benefits but i really am not sure

Tessiebear Thu 21-Apr-05 09:33:34

That is a very good question Tex (Congrats on your pregnancy btw). I B/F DS2 for 2 years and towards the end i did it for HIS comfort reasons and getting him to sleep etc - i would assume that past about a year there wasnt that many additional health benefits but i really am not sure

Tessiebear Thu 21-Apr-05 09:33:37

That is a very good question Tex (Congrats on your pregnancy btw). I B/F DS2 for 2 years and towards the end i did it for HIS comfort reasons and getting him to sleep etc - i would assume that past about a year there wasnt that many additional health benefits but i really am not sure

Ameriscot2005 Thu 21-Apr-05 09:38:01

Breastmilk is more nutritious than solid food, so it is always going to be good for the diet, whatever the age of the child.

Ameriscot2005 Thu 21-Apr-05 09:38:31

Breastmilk is more nutritious than solid food, so it is always going to be good for the diet, whatever the age of the child.

Ameriscot2005 Thu 21-Apr-05 09:39:10

Breastmilk is more nutritious than solid food, so it is always going to be good for the diet, whatever the age of the child.

Ameriscot2005 Thu 21-Apr-05 09:39:18

Breastmilk is more nutritious than solid food, so it is always going to be good for the diet, whatever the age of the child.

Ameriscot2005 Thu 21-Apr-05 09:40:23

Got it?

JoolsToo Thu 21-Apr-05 09:44:11

yes!

I have never questioned the nutritional value of breast milk but I would have thought age 2 and upwards toddlers are quite capable of using a cup so why not express and give it that way?

bobbybob Thu 21-Apr-05 09:44:53

ggg - yes but where would the child have learnt to call it a "tit, tit, tit"? Mother or Father must have thought it was cute once.

Lots of long term bfed babies ask to "nurse" or my ds says "mummy drink". Totally unembarrassing, and they don't say it all time, only when they want to nurse.

Tex - antibodies still work whatever the age of the child. The immune system isn't fully developed until about 5, so extended feeding makes sense from that point of view.

Plus benefits to the mother increase with duration. If you are only having the one child (like me probably) then actually 2-3 years isn't that long.

bobbybob Thu 21-Apr-05 09:46:17

Joolstoo - why on earth would I go to all that trouble of expressing, when I can serve it instantly, at the right temparture?

Ameriscot2005 Thu 21-Apr-05 10:05:12

What's the point of expressing when the perfect amount is already there at the perfect temperature?

And not to forget the comfort aspect. Why would you deny your child comfort? It seems cruel.

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