to wonder why women need special classes...

(135 Posts)

...in bricklaying, plumbing, woodwork and decorating effects! Just browsing through the local college prospectus and in starter courses there they are. Specialist decorating effects, intro to woodworking skills, basic plumbing and intro to bricklaying then after listing them all they are repeated but specified For Women.
Do they have lighter bricks for our dainty little hands? Do we use hearts and flowers and fluffy bunnies for decorating effects while the men use ox bollocks as rollers ?
It smacks of let's let the little ladies think they can do these man things. Arent they funny little creatures? fnaar fnaar fnaar snort!
Maybe its less intimidating or they have them for that reason but it seems so patronising.
Rant over.

YouTheCat Thu 29-Aug-13 17:33:26

I find it patronising too.

MrsOakenshield Thu 29-Aug-13 17:35:13

I'm guessing because some women may find it intimidating doing a course for a traditionally 'male' occupation with a load of blokes. I don't know, to be honest, but if it gets more women doing these jobs (if they want to), does it matter?

Feminine Thu 29-Aug-13 17:35:57

I'd prefer to do it in an only women class TBH.

YouTheCat Thu 29-Aug-13 17:37:01

If these are starter classes though everyone will be beginning with little knowledge or expertise.

I think it's better to have mixed classes or it just compounds the view that women aren't as able (which is bollocks).

StephenFrySaidSo Thu 29-Aug-13 17:38:51

is it possible one of the courses is to lead to a qualification that will allow you to work as a (say) bricklayer and the other is less intensive for people who just want to do DIY at home?

Yes mrs O I did think that. But then they'd have to compete in business with these men so why separate them when theyre learning where the blokes could more tolerant?

Could learn to be more tolerant..sorry on my phone.

Nope exactly the same course but labelled..'For Women'

waltzingmathilda Thu 29-Aug-13 17:41:05

I dont understand why they need classes to give birth grin

FranklymydearIdontgiveadamn Thu 29-Aug-13 17:41:10

I did a womens diy course and it was great fun! We all had the same base level of skills and knowledge and no one felt self concious about not knowing things

2beornot Thu 29-Aug-13 17:41:16

I'm guessing because some women may find it intimidating doing a course for a traditionally 'male' occupation with a load of blokes. I don't know, to be honest, but if it gets more women doing these jobs (if they want to), does it matter?

But if they're intimidated on a course, how are they to manage on a building site?

LIZS Thu 29-Aug-13 17:41:41

our local college does these, also basic car maintenance. I think some women may prefer it as they can choose what they want to learn and discuss and try things out without the pressure a male critic. Not sure where the college stands on sexual discrimination as not sure they can legitimately turn a male student away.

2beornot Thu 29-Aug-13 17:42:12

is it possible one of the courses is to lead to a qualification that will allow you to work as a (say) bricklayer and the other is less intensive for people who just want to do DIY at home?

But then they should label them as such, not men and women

StephenFrySaidSo Thu 29-Aug-13 17:43:06

"But if they're intimidated on a course, how are they to manage on a building site?"

a starter course wont be for people going to work on a building site.

StephenFrySaidSo Thu 29-Aug-13 17:43:53

I agree 2be- I was just wondering if that was why the 2 options.

LIZS Thu 29-Aug-13 17:44:14

Agree these are usually leisure/evening classes not vocational.

bamboobutton Thu 29-Aug-13 17:46:04

I can't imagine anything worse that trying to do a traditionally male course surrounded by patronising and condescending men just waiting for me to fuck up so they can smirk in an "I told you women weren't no good at man stuff" smirky way.

YouTheCat Thu 29-Aug-13 17:48:11

Isn't it better to show them that women are perfectly capable?

Why are we so afraid of what men think?

Ok...look at it this way. They dont have basic massage then a separate basic massage for men. Or basic nail art then basic nail art for men. And just to put an extra notch on the patronising tone there is automotive maintenance then Women on Wheels (automotive maintenance for women) they're even taught in the same time slot just a different room. hmm

OhDearNigel Thu 29-Aug-13 17:50:28

I would quite like to do a women's DIY course. I would like to know how to do more DIY stuff but if I ask DH or DF I just get patronised. Or they make things sounds a lot more complex than they are

Don't get me wrong, I've always worked in male-dominated jobs and have absolutely no issue with being the only female in a group of men; however, I would feel more comfortable admitting I can't work out how to use an electric drill in front of a group of women that are probably in the same boat rather than a group of men

exoticfruits Thu 29-Aug-13 17:51:22

I would much prefer a women's only class if I were to do it.
I am presuming they are for DIY. If it was for an apprenticeship they would be in together.

bamboobutton Thu 29-Aug-13 17:53:45

I suppose because massage isn't notorious for ripping men off, patronising them and generally treating them like dimwits.

DiseasesOfTheSheep Thu 29-Aug-13 17:53:45

I'd rather be in the men's group...

But then I might have issues focussing on the task in hand wink

2kidsintow Thu 29-Aug-13 17:54:01

My friend enrolled for a standard mechanics course last year. Her and 8 men.

Due to fears of potential harassment complaints, several times in the year, they had to check she felt comfortable doing certain things when it was just her and a load of men. She thought it ridiculous, but the college would have got in trouble if they hadn't followed their procedures.

Perhaps, running women only classes removes such problems.

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