GP really arsey

(126 Posts)
sukysue Fri 12-Jul-13 22:26:52

Well aibu? took dd1 to gp for emergency appt to get antibiotics for cellulitis on her leg following insect bites . She is away at uni and is registered there now not at the home surgery but of course she is home now.Anyway she had to register as a temporary patient to see the gp today. When we went in she gave dd the antibiotics straight away within about 1 minites consultation it was 5 o'clock and we were the last patient waiting. She was on emergency surgery till 6.30. So while we were there I said to her oh dr could you please prescribe my dd some duac for her acne. She went on about how it was an emergency appt and that it wasn't really the time and place to ask for that,she then went on to say I have been here for 3 hours in surgery and I have had a terrible day . By the time she had finished moaning and being arsey if she had just given her the bloody duac we would have been gone already I explained that we wouldn't be going back any time soon as she was in uni and this was to prevent a waste of ours and their time getting an appt just for the duac,honestly we never go to the gp . I was very nice to her thanked her very much and creep arsed around her but it has really upset me to be honest it was such a little thing to ask of her there was no need for her to treat us like that. I just feel really deflated at her attitude. I wish I could do just a four and a half hour shift.

Sirzy Fri 12-Jul-13 22:29:27

I thought one appointment one problem was standard - even more so at an emergency appointment.

I also find it strange that a child old enough to be at uni needs a parent to ask for medicine for them anyway!

AmandaPandtheTantrumofDoom Fri 12-Jul-13 22:30:58

I'm sorry, but I agree with her. Emergency appointments are for emergencies.

She is a temporary patient, she can make an appointment for the prescription.

MagicBaguette Fri 12-Jul-13 22:31:29

Yabvu.

That's not how a GP works.

You don't turn up and demand that they prescribe you something, and she is right that she shouldn't diagnose/prescribe something non urgent at an emergency appointment. It requires a consultation.

she probably shouldn't have moaned to you, but it sounds like you we're being a bit of an arse so she felt she had to explain herself in very blunt and direct terms.

claraschu Fri 12-Jul-13 22:34:19

GP being a jerk, if your other problem was quick. I hate this kind of officious behaviour- following the letter of the rule, rather than common sense and kindness.

Montybojangles Fri 12-Jul-13 22:34:20

One appointment, one problem. Emergency appointments are for emergency problems only, not for some prescription your dd should have arranged in good time with her regular surgery.
YABU.

Kasterborous Fri 12-Jul-13 22:34:36

Sorry but YABU. Emergency appointments aren't the place to discuss routine things. I had an emergency appointment the other week for a burned hand. I needed hay fever meds too but I made a separate routine appointment for that. That said I can see why you asked.

sukysue Fri 12-Jul-13 22:35:58

well dd really wasn't very well and actually nearly flaked out on me in there otherwise I wouldn't have gone with her but she asked me to go in with her . As mentioned we never go to the gp and I have never heard one problem one appt before is this normal protocol in all surgeries? Bit daft really cos by me asking it hs saved their time and it literally took 1 minite for her to do .

sunandstars Fri 12-Jul-13 22:36:55

Yabu.

An emergency appt. for a temporary patient is not for routine acne medication which she should be getting from her own GP at university. If she is at university she is old enough and should be respinsible for organising this herself.

The GP is very likely to have been doing other work in addition to the surgery time and have rheams of paperwork. Do you really think GPs just see patients in their surgery time and then go home?

Onesleeptillwembley Fri 12-Jul-13 22:39:23

She was right for all the reasons above. Why on earth did you even go in with a supposed adult, let alone ask for medication for her?confused That's a bit creepy.

AmandaPandtheTantrumofDoom Fri 12-Jul-13 22:40:36

Yes, it is normal protocol. Otherwise how the hell do they keep to schedule.

People moan when their appointment is running late, and moan when they can't cover everything they want.

Our GP has big signs saying that if you have two issues you need to book a double appointment. it is on their website too. In your case, you knew you had an emergency appointment. That means emergency issues.

Sorry, but YABU.

Sidge Fri 12-Jul-13 22:41:31

Generally speaking if you see a GP as a TR (temporary resident) then you should only receive immediate necessary treatment. That would exclude regular medication as it should be prescribed, monitored and reviewed by your own GP.

Also the GP may have been doing that clinic for 3 hours but may well have done a morning surgery from 0800-1230, then done home and hospital visits for a few hours then done an afternoon surgery from 1500-1830 for example.

idiot55 Fri 12-Jul-13 22:42:39

I think you we're not being unreasonable, you will have to go back, use another slot etc etc.

Perhaps if appointments weren't so hard to get, people wouldn't have to save up all their medical problems for when they finally get one. Not the GP's fault or the patients just an unfortunate sign of the times I guess.

ilovesunflowers Fri 12-Jul-13 22:43:38

It's minute not minite.

I doubt the doc had only had a 4 hour shift. They'd probably been doing home visits for hours as well. Yabu to want acne medication in an emergency appointment. Let your daughter get this herself when she's at uni.

BlackMini Fri 12-Jul-13 22:43:48

It was an emergency appointment, not for routine problems. The GP didn't have her notes to refer to either. YABVVU.

AmandaPandtheTantrumofDoom Fri 12-Jul-13 22:46:20

Yes yes, GP didn't have her notes. Didn't know for sure what she'd had in the past (she can't rely on your word). She would have had to do a full and detailed consultation as if for a first prescription. It wasn't a 2 minute job.

Why didn't your DD get this dealt with before she left uni BTW?

Inkblinkandmustard Fri 12-Jul-13 22:48:48

You got a same day appointment for a temporary resident, dealt with quickly and you're not happy! YABU. You have no idea who else might be coming in, and the GP probably has a paperwork mountain waiting also

apostropheuse Fri 12-Jul-13 22:52:30

YABU The emergency appointment was for the cellulitis issue, which can be a serious emergency and needs to be attended to urgently. The acne is is routine condition that she can consult her own doctor about.

Emergency appointments would run over time if patients all had just another little thing to mention to the doctor. That's not the purpose of the appointment.

You are also being unreasonable going in to the doctor's surgery with your adult daughter, and even more so for telling the doctor what you wanted prescribed.

ImagineJL Fri 12-Jul-13 22:52:37

YABU.

It's quite possible there wasn't actually an appointment slot at all, and your DD was added on the end.

Also, prescribing drugs is not like turning on a tap. It requires thought, considering medical history, others medication, allergies, sometimes blood test monitoring - all of this takes time, and is especially difficult with temporary residents who are not known to the GP.

Mummydoctor Fri 12-Jul-13 22:56:13

This sounds like some of the c

ILoveDolly Fri 12-Jul-13 22:56:14

As per other posts, GPs have loads to do besides surgeries, work very long days, see all kinds of really sick patients they probably could do with having extra time to talk to..... and you're surprised she was arsey. Really your daughter is old enough to be managing her own health at her own drs, I would add.

Montybojangles Fri 12-Jul-13 22:56:47

Appointments

The length of a GP appointment is 10 minutes, a nurse appointment 15 minutes and a HCA appointment 10 minutes. If you have several issues to discuss, please book a double appointment. If you cannot attend, please cancel as soon as possible so that we can allocate the appointment to someone else. Urgent cases will be seen as soon as possible. Please be considerate if someone else needs to be given priority.

Seeing the Doctor

Patients may see the doctor of their choice subject to availability. This may sometimes require you to travel to the other surgery in order to be seen sooner. On occasions a fully qualified and experienced locum GP may be in attendance.

 For illnesses that are not life threatening you should arrange a routine appointment. These appointments with the GP are longer than an 'on the day emergency appointment' and can be booked in advance.  They are normally available within a few days of you calling and are the preferred way of getting to see a doctor, as they are able to spend more time with you. 

Urgent Appointments

  This is for a 5 minute appointment with a doctor and they can only deal with only one problem These appointments will be at the end of the doctor’s surgeries and there may be a longer wait than usual.  

We respectfully ask that you consider carefully whether your problem is urgent.

Mummydoctor Fri 12-Jul-13 22:59:24

Sorry! Some of the consultations I have had during busy on call days. What people sometimes don't see are all the other 'urgent' things waiting to be dealt with - the urgent blood result which means arranging a hospital admission, the nurse wanting an ECG reviewed, late home visit etc etc.

Most GPs are drowning in the workload currently being shifted into primary care and ever increasing demand. Rant over.

bimbabirba Fri 12-Jul-13 23:02:39

OP have you considered that perhaps she said no because she would have had to do a full consultation before prescribing what you asked? If the medicine you wanted was not on repeat then it wasn't as straight forward or quick as you seem to make out.

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