To spend a lot on something that lasts years instead of similar on lots of cheaper items that don't last?

(84 Posts)
babysaurus Thu 09-May-13 21:12:20

This is a light hearted AIBU, please be gentle!

A friends daughter, 9, hates brushing her hair as its thick and brushing hurts it. She also fights having it washed for the same reason. Her mum has bought detangling sprays and lots of different brushes, "the last one cost me £8", but none have helped enough. I have a Mason Pearson brush which she used (I took it over for her to try) and the difference was amazing. Unfortunately these brushes cost £35+. My friend said she would (not could) pay that much for a brush as its ridiculous, but has prob spent at least that already on cheaper brands.

This prompted a lighthearted discussion with her over buying one off expensive products that last forever (my last Mason Pearson was a 12th birthday present and it lasted till I was 36) and her preference of buying cheaper things but on a regular basis (she has pans that look like Le Creuset but aren't, for example) because paying huge amounts for things when you can get an equivalent for less is apparently the way to go. (Not a purely financial decision.)

So, if you were there too, would you be agreeing with me or my friend...?!

WMittens Sun 12-May-13 09:56:36

I spend £1 on a hairbrush from wilkinsons and generally buy one every couple of years. A £35 brush would have to last 70 years to be value for money

Not necessarily, value is not just about cost but also about effectiveness. I had no idea brushes could be so different, so I'm just going to make up some numbers to demonstrate:

Assume the cheap brush takes 20 minutes to get tangles out of hair, and the £35 brush takes 5 minutes - time saving 15 minutes per day.
What's 15 minutes worth? If we take the national minimum wage (not applicable to a 9 year old, but we need some way to quantify it) of £6.19 for over 21s, it takes 23 days to be worth £35. Leaving aside money, what is an extra 15 minutes in bed every morning worth to you? (Or at least, to someone with very tangly hair.)

One argument for a £35 brush for a 9 year old: OP says the girl hates brushing and washing her hair - it is possible she now associates personal hygiene/grooming practices with unpleasantness so adapts to avoid them - this could cause problems with social interaction later. That is an extreme extrapolation, but I don't think it's beyond the realms of possibility - school can be cruel.

RhondaJean Sun 12-May-13 10:04:08

I often have this disagreement with my mother re furniture and things like that.

Buy cheap and buy twice. Or a dozen times in her case.

She actually has a mason Pearson brush, the end bristle are worn down now but as she bought it in her 20s and she's now 66 it's done pretty well!

I lost mines. Gutted. Haven't replaced it yet.

I agree with most thing the better quality you can afford the less it costs you long term. There are some exceptions, children's clothes for day to day possibly being one of them.

differentnameforthis Sun 12-May-13 11:31:58

My daughter has the same kind of hair. NO WAY would I spend $779 (lowest price I found online) for a hair brush!

I find that washing with a shampoo & cond, and wearing it up in bed/most of the day help heaps! The de-tangling spray we have used int he past only seems to add to the difficulty once dried! So I just use water for de-tangling!

differentnameforthis Sun 12-May-13 11:32:21

$79, not $779

babysaurus Sun 12-May-13 20:34:23

WMittens my friends DD is a bit of a soap avoider, although not entirely sure if the hair thing is part of it.

orangeandemons Sun 12-May-13 21:23:33

Yy to tieing it up in bed. That definitely stops it tangling up.

Jan49 Sun 12-May-13 22:13:09

I have a ds, not a dd, but I think if I had a child whose hair took 45 a day to untangle and brush I'd want them to have it cut a lot shorter. Spend the money on a haircut rather than an expensive brush!

Jan49 Sun 12-May-13 22:13:29

That's 45 minutes.

hollyisalovelyname Sun 03-Nov-13 09:36:50

Get a Tangle Teaser. They're brilliant

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