Note: Please bear in mind that whilst this topic does canvass opinions, it is not a fight club. You may disagree with other posters but we do ask you please to stick to our Talk Guidelines and to be civil. We don't allow personal attacks or troll-hunting. Do please report any. Thanks, MNHQ.

To think this teacher is fucking loopy?

(272 Posts)
OverReactionMuch Sat 16-Feb-13 18:12:50

DS2 (just 5) apparently broke a branch off one of the trees in the school playground. He was swinging on it (normal boy behaviour?).

Teacher, who is Head of KS1 then paraded him around all the KS1 classes with the offending branch lecturing the other DC on how naughty my DC was and what a terrible thing he did.

She also phoned me (I did not know she had taken him round the classes) to inform me of my DS's 'crime'. I said I would talk to him. She also took the 'dead' branch into the afterschool club and showed all the DC there and so the staff could show me the offending article when I picked him up.

DS has said that he did not mean for the branch to come off.

I am actually quite furious that she has demonised my DS to the other DCs. DS has found it very hard to settle into school and I actually had a meeting with this woman before he started at school as I was concerned about how he would settle (undiagnosed SN is my mother's gut instinct) and she has totally ignored every thing I said.

AIBU to loudly voice my displeasure on Monday?

FlouncingMintyy Sat 16-Feb-13 18:46:27

FGS listen to you on this thread!

"I think I'd give her a slap. What an utter bitch".

"March in there Monday and give her what for!"

"Wow nasty cow I'd go mad for that"

It is a great shame to snap a branch off a tree! Perhaps the school has a strict rule on non branch swinging and your ds broke it.

Please please try and have a bit of respect if you must go in and find out what actually happened, rather than accusing the teacher of "parading" your son and shaming him.

If you go in all guns blazing they will not take you seriously anyway, but I would have thought anyone with one iota of natural intelligence could appreciate that.

crashdoll Sat 16-Feb-13 18:47:41

I would certainly not march in and go mad. I would calmly get the facts from the teacher before you go demanding to see the headteacher. Was it your son who told you what she did?

EndoplasmicReticulum Sat 16-Feb-13 18:49:18

I think a lot depends on how often she had told him / other children not to swing from the tree branches.

And it depends on how the "parading" was done. Was it "look at this naughty boy" or was it "swinging from trees is dangerous"

I suppose it all adds up to getting the school's side of the story first before loudly voicing displeasure.

Lafaminute Sat 16-Feb-13 18:50:16

OF COURSE he should have been reprimanded for his behaviour but humiliating him was so below the belt and unacceptable. I would complain - on the grounds that this is bullying behaviour, on the part of the teacher

HollyBerryBush Sat 16-Feb-13 18:50:43

A study by Play England found that we're wrapping up our kids in a cotton-wool culture of safe, soft play.

Over half of all children have been prevented by their parents from climbing trees, for example, whilst 21% are prohibited from playing conkers and 17% stopped from playing tag and chase.

Yet, these outdoor activities - deemed too dangerous for today's generation to take part in - were those most fondly remembered childhood games by 70% of parents questioned. And guess what? 77% of children questioned wished they had more freedom to enjoy these kinds of pastimes.

But it's not just adventure we're depriving our kids of. A study published last month in a child health journal also found that today's 10-year-olds have less muscular strength than children born 10 years before them because they don't do activities like climbing trees and ropes any more. It's action games like this that boost muscular strength so that they can hold their own body weight.

MissAnnersley Sat 16-Feb-13 18:51:09

I agree Mintyy, the language used on this thread about the teacher is a bit scary.

I totally, totally get why you're angry - I would be too but you need to dial it down a bit so you can get to the bottom of what happened.

Poster saying they would slap the teacher? Really?

MrsDeVere Sat 16-Feb-13 18:52:59

The school does NOT have to agree that your child needs to be referred. What utter nonsense. Schools are schools. They are not in charge of your child's medical needs. If the GP told you this he is fobbing you off. Go back and see another GP.

What sort of SN do you think he has?

Its a bit confusing though. Do you think this is 'normal boy behaviour' or behaviour due to his un dx SN?

Its not normal boy behaviour. I have four. Some of them would, some of them wouldn't. Its not abnormal childish behaviour, but I wouldn't expect a boy to do it and a girl not to.

If she did parade him around she was OTT. Find out what happened first. Ask them for their version of events before you kick off.

maddening Sat 16-Feb-13 18:53:39

She has punished him as if he had done an act of deliberate vandalism. I would speak to her - get her side then decide what to do. If you are unsure then tell her you will consider her response and get back to her - then if you want to go ahead you have more info to hand when drafting your complaint.

BOF Sat 16-Feb-13 18:54:32

Hollyberry, that's all well and good, but even in the seventies the teachers would have gone apeshit if you'd been doing all that on school grounds.

Euphemia Sat 16-Feb-13 18:56:12

By some posters' reckoning, normal boy behaviour would presumably include clambering over the chairs and under the tables too? Throwing rubbers, mucking about throwing water in the toilets? Should we just let them get on with it?

soverylucky Sat 16-Feb-13 18:56:16

I agree with flouncing

Find out calmly what happened and take it from there. I am shock that people think that it is ok to go in and slap her...but then thinking about it, I am not really.

fluffywhitekittens Sat 16-Feb-13 18:56:35

HollyBerry I don't disagree. I just think there is a time and a place for tree climbing, swinging and it's not during school break times.

Meglet Sat 16-Feb-13 18:57:03

It's normal child behaviour to swing on branches. A stern telling off would suffice.

I really hope the teacher didn't march him around making an example of him, he's reception year right? sad.

soverylucky Sat 16-Feb-13 18:57:22

Too add - I hate when people let naughty children behave badly because they are boys. Boys are perfectly capable of behaving themselves and I hate to see them labelled like this.

LilQueenie Sat 16-Feb-13 18:57:42

just for the record I am a girl and I climbed trees and anything else that took my fancy. I fell got hurt and got up and done it again. I was encouraged to do it again so I didnt get afraid of what had hurt me.

SmileAndPeopleSmileWithYou Sat 16-Feb-13 18:58:17

A 5 year old boy is supposed to be inquisitive and would naturally want to swing on a tree branch. It is up to the school to make it a rule that they cannot do this (which they may have done). If this has been done then yes it is bad behaviour.

The punishment was not right. He is only 5! How demoralising.
I agree with previous posts, this could have been highlighted to the whole school without subjecting him to that. i.e. "It is not safe to swing on branches as someone could get hurt, this branch has come off and we are lucky this time".

Go in and calmly ask about the circumstances before expressing your worries.

Euphemia Sat 16-Feb-13 18:59:01

Indeed, Holly, but is it the school's job to facilitate this? Should trees be planted in the school ground specifically for children to climb on/swing on? Or should children be taught to respect school property?

Pagwatch Sat 16-Feb-13 18:59:41

I really do want to know how the OP knows what the teacher did?

Feenie Sat 16-Feb-13 19:01:47

* MrsRajeshKoothrappali Sat 16-Feb-13 18:15:05*

I think I'd give her a slap.

What an utter bitch.

Yes, get yourself charged with assault, that will definitely help the situation. hmm

crashdoll Sat 16-Feb-13 19:02:23

I wonder how many times he was asked to stop....? Not condoning the teacher's behaviour btw but do we even know who gave the account of what happened?

cheesesarnie Sat 16-Feb-13 19:03:55

he should have been told off but not humiliated.

i would make an appointment to speak to her and state (calmly) that you feel that she over reacted.

countrykitten Sat 16-Feb-13 19:05:12

As a little girl I was always hanging out of trees and such (bit never school trees!) - so a bit annoyed at your sexist assumptions about 'normal boy behaviour' OP.

Apart from that, swinging on trees at school is not good behaviour at all and if he has been asked not to do it then he deserves to be punished as he has damaged the tree as well as putting himself at risk. You sound exactly like the sort of parent who would rush in all guns blazing had another child torn off a tree branch and it had fallen on/hurt your son in some way. Many school rules are in place for health and safety reasons. Let him climb trees to his heart's content when he is not in school - then it is YOUR responsibility if he falls and not a teacher's.

The fact that you think he was 'paraded' around classrooms...hmmmm. Who told you about this? Maybe the Head of KS1 was concerned about safety and was driving home a point - you were not there,you don't know.

To go in all guns blazing would make you look like a fool - get the facts straight and then say politely whatever you feel you need to say. One of the irrefutable facts is that your child misbehaved at school so try getting your head around that before haranguing teachers.

And as for the mother's instinct on SEN. Get it sorted out (or not) and don't use this as a half excuse for poor behaviour - it is insulting to kids who have SEN.

WhatKindofFool Sat 16-Feb-13 19:05:46

I think the school is right for not allowing swinging from trees. However, the teacher sounds like a nasty piece of work. I cannot bear humiliation like this. Go in and calmly explain that you think the teacher's reaction was unacceptable.

badtemperedaldbitch Sat 16-Feb-13 19:05:54

On my dd's first day of school, she fell out of a tree.... They are encouraged to climb...

I was thrilled. We moved from a city to the countryside and I'd much rather her fall out a tree than not know what one looked like

HollyBerryBush Sat 16-Feb-13 19:07:28

Indeed, Holly, but is it the school's job to facilitate this? Should trees be planted in the school ground specifically for children to climb on/swing on? Or should children be taught to respect school property?

I agree with you there BUT we live in a compo culture, therefore it is the schools responsibility to remove/reduce risk.

Personally I think it's someones responsibility to look where they are going, but I dare say, others will disagree with me regarding uneaven paving slabs etc. Tree with low branches = legitimate dangling post. Trimmed tree = no dangling. Problem solved.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now