OAP home allows residents to book sex workers

(262 Posts)
Charlezee Tue 29-Jan-13 01:43:27
badgeroncaffeine Tue 29-Jan-13 01:55:37

It's also here:

Mail item

I have to agree with the top rated comments there...

..these people are humans and not vegetables and shouldn't be deprived of a sex life if they want one.

JustAHolyFool Tue 29-Jan-13 01:56:40

What do YOU think?

badgeroncaffeine Tue 29-Jan-13 01:58:21

Good point JustAHolyFool
Why do people ask others' views without stating their own...very odd.

FarelyKnuts Tue 29-Jan-13 02:01:22

I would wonder the same as others, surely you state your opinion in your OP!

And I think that sex is not a right because someone has "needs".

Charlezee Tue 29-Jan-13 02:13:34

My opinion is if the participants are consenting adults (disabled or not disabled) then there is no issue.

notcitrus Tue 29-Jan-13 02:13:36

Legally-competent adults do legal things in their own home; landlord allows them to enjoy privacy of home.
Whether I like said legal activities is neither here nor there.

I worked in nursing homes and although it never happened it wasn't something we could or would try and stop as they were consenting adults.

We did have residents visiting each others rooms though

Booyhoo Tue 29-Jan-13 02:47:52

paying for sex is legal? since when?

OldLadyKnowsNothing Tue 29-Jan-13 02:50:05

A website dedictated to escorts willing to work with the disabled. I am a great believer in the rights of consenting adults to do what they wish with their bodies, and am heartened by the comments so far.

OldLadyKnowsNothing Tue 29-Jan-13 02:52:27

Booyhoo, it is legal to pay for sex, and it is legal to be paid for sex. It is illegal to solicit in a public place and to "kerbcrawl". It is also illegal to control and to profit from the sexual activities of prostitutes. Otherwise, no probs atm.

Booyhoo Tue 29-Jan-13 02:54:08

ah thank you. i knew there was something that was illegal along those lines.

OldLadyKnowsNothing Tue 29-Jan-13 03:19:32

It worries me that so many people who are keen to discuss paid sex, actually know so little about the law surrounding it. Calling for "decriminalising" it, when it's not actually a criminal offense really bugs me.

I'm not including you in that group, Booyhoo, because I have no idea how you feel about the general topic, but I see it time and time again, and it drives me nuts...

<bit of a pedant, but have been accused of being a pimp, a john or a prostitute so many times for saying so...>

PurplePidjin Tue 29-Jan-13 03:48:55

Afaik it's only illegal to solicit - ie if a staff member makes the arrangement and/or hands over the money. The visitors a mentally competent adult has to their home, and what they choose to do in private, is not up to the staff to decide

OldLadyKnowsNothing Tue 29-Jan-13 04:30:03

That would not be soliciting. Soliciting is streetwork, attempting to attract custom in public. (NB, advertising on tinterwebz is not soliciting.) It's a public nuisance type of offense.

The staff member making the arrangement could be in trouble, but only if s/he both controls and profits from the prostitute, though I suspect that their conditions of employment might say otherwise.

What consenting adults do in the privacy of their own homes, is up to them.

PurplePidjin Tue 29-Jan-13 04:37:22

Sorry, know the theory (never had to act on it thankfully!) but not the terminology smile

It could, and imo should, be argued that a residential care home is the person's home - why should they have fewer rights just because they have physical or learning support needs?

OldLadyKnowsNothing Tue 29-Jan-13 04:41:41

As I said, it's a bit of a bugbear with me, sorry. But yes, absolutely, residential care is that person's home, and they absolutely have the right to decide what they do in it.

Um, too many "absolutely"s there, but you get the idea.

Charlezee Tue 29-Jan-13 04:45:09

"and am heartened by the comments so far."

Agree. The readers' comments on both the news articles above are encouraging.

OldLadyKnowsNothing Tue 29-Jan-13 04:45:13

I'm not saying they have a "right" to have sex, btw, but they have the "right" to invite whatever visitors they want.

dublinrose37 Tue 29-Jan-13 10:06:45

I don't have an issue with it, its a private matter if a person wants to pay for sex and someone else wants to offer it for sale. I would imagine the payment comes from their own money too and I don't see why they should be prevented doing something they could do in their own home just because they are in a care home. Its not a prison.

StewieGriffinsMom Tue 29-Jan-13 10:10:46

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

carmenelectra Tue 29-Jan-13 10:59:12

I was just watching a discussion of this on The Wright Stuff.

Obviously, its prefectly legal to pay for sex and I guess in theory if someone is housebound and unable to doesn't have a partner then its an option. Yes, we all have needs but its not the same as having the right to sex.

However, I don't have a problem with a person paying a willing(I will say that loosely)prostitute to have sex with them. What is a totally different topic though are those who say there are men so frustrated that they are groping staff.they have no self control.

In actual fact, these men are abusing staff! Its not a natural outlet to maul a stranger because you fancy a shag. Plenty of people go all their lives with no or little sex and they don't die. And what about women? Do they suffer quietly because as we all know their sex drive isn't as strong.

I've been groped plenty of times over the 10 years I worked in nursing homes, however it was never by the compos mentis residents.

Same with the male carers, it's not something just the male patients do

StewieGriffinsMom Tue 29-Jan-13 11:56:27

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Leithlurker Tue 29-Jan-13 15:17:40

A clear line of departure needs drawn between those who are wilfully abusing staff members of either sex, and those particularly older people with forms of dementia that produce aggressive sexualised behaviour. The dementia causes the behaviour even in people who can still have periods of being time and place oriented. Or "compos mentis"

It might also be a result of unsafe working practises in residential establishments where both staff and patience are forced in to situations which are only barely legal in terms of health and safety but leave both groups open to abuse.

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